California Gray

"Gandy," a California Grey cockerel
Photo courtesy of Gary Lawrence

The California Gray was developed around 1930 by Professor James Dryden. The goal was a dual purpose breed that laid large white eggs, as that was what the market wanted at that time. And he was also striving for a bird that would lay well for more than 2 years. The birds have a body type heavier than a Leghorn but not as "clunky" as a Rock. Unlike most of the white egg breeds, Grays are not flighty birds and are excellent winter layers in cold climates.

When California Gray roosters are put on White Leghorn hens, a sex-linked hybrid, the California White, is produced. This hybrid is popular in the northern midwest and Canada. It is a white bird with occasional black feathers and can be feather-sexed at hatching.


California Links:


A Cal Gray cockerel
Photos courtesy of Elisa Robertson

Another shot of "Gandy"
Photo courtesy of Gary Lawrence

A flock of California Grays
Photo courtesy of Elisa Robertson

This is "Martha," a four-month-old California White pullet
Photo courtesy of Natalie King

Cal Gray pullets
Photos courtesy of Elisa Robertson

Another California Gray cockerel
Photo courtesy of Elisa Robertson

Sarah collecting eggs from a flock of California Grays
Photo courtesy of Dan Flyger Freeman

A California White hen
Photo courtesy of Jason C.

A California Gray hen
Photo courtesy of Stephanie Smith


California Gray chicks
Photos courtesy of Elisa Robertson

A California White chick
Photo courtesy of Natalie King

By 3 weeks you can often tell the sexes apart -- that's a cockerel on the right
Photo courtesy of Elisa Robertson


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