Ixworth Fowl

An Ixworth cockerel
Photo by Matthew Crabb on behalf of the Cobthorn Trust, courtesy of Andrew Sheppy

Text by Andrew Sheppy

The Ixworth was produced during the 1930s in the village of Ixworth in Suffolk, England. The originator was Reginald Appleyard who set out to make a breed which was a first class, quick maturing table breed which could also give worthwhile egg production. In the mix of ancestors for the new breed Appleyard used White Old English Game, Indian (Cornish) Game, White Sussex, White Orpington and White Minorca. The eventual breed fulfilled all the requirements, including the fine white skin necessary for the English table market.

Ixworths are quite deceptive to look at, being a great deal heavier and more solid than they appear. They are active hardy birds which do well on free range. There is only the one variety, White, which has pinkish white legs and beak with all white plumage. The comb is always of pea type and the eyes are orange to red in colour.

The breed very nearly died out in the period 1950-1970, but one or two people stuck with them. There is now a rather bigger following for the breed and several keen breeders, but the breed is still very much a rare breed. They have been kept here at Cobthorn for most of the last 30 years and are the breed of first choice when I want a roasting chicken for the table. They are simply our best table breed.


Ixworth Links:

Ixworth at Julian Projects

South Yeo Farm East


The head of an Ixworth cockerel
Photo courtesy of Krys Francis and Beverlea Pursglove

An Ixworth hen
Photo courtesy of Krys Francis and Beverlea Pursglove

Another Ixworth rooster
Photo courtesy of Krys Francis and Beverlea Pursglove

A flock of Ixworths
Photo courtesy of Gillian Dixon

An Ixworth cockerel
Photo courtesy of Rupert Stephenson


An Ixworth chick
Photo courtesy of Kris Bentley


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