Marsh Daisy

A Marsh Daisy rooster
Photo courtesy of Richard Zatloukal

Considered a small bird for a heavy breed, the Marsh Daisy was developed in Lancashire, England, in the early 1900s. It has OEG bantams, Hamburgs, Buttercups and Malays in its heritage. This strange melange of breeds produced a bird somewhat gamey in character and excellent on range, even in poor or swampy areas. They are also considered good layers and broodies.

The variety most commonly seen is the Wheaten. The willow colored legs end in horn colored toe nails. A large rosecomb is another feature of the breed, with a leader that follows the head, although not as closely as in Wyandottes. Eyes are red and the lobes are sort of lemon in color, although often described as white. Males weigh around 6-7 pounds and females 5-6 pounds.


Marsh Daisy Links:

They have Marsh Daisies at henrun


A Wheaten Marsh Daisy cockerel
Photo courtesy of Michael Brook & Paul Bradshaw

A Marsh Daisy pullet
Photo courtesy of Greenfire Farms

A Marsh Daisy cockerel
Photo courtesy of henrun

A Marsh Daisy female
Photo courtesy of henrun

"Lowry," a young cockerel, crowing
Photo courtesy of henrun

A Marsh Daisy cockerel, showing how the leader from the comb should follow the line of the head
Photos courtesy of Greenfire Farms

Another Marsh Daisy rooster
Photo courtesy of Steven Clapcott

Another Marsh Daisy rooster
Photo © Rupert Stephenson

A Marsh Daisy cockerel telling someone where to go
Photo courtesy of Greenfire Farms


A Marsh Daisy chick
Photo courtesy of Kris Bentley


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