Muscovy Ducks

aka Scobies

Cairina moschata

My very first Muscovy, "Donald The Duck," a Blue drake. Donald truly knew his name and came when called.


Muscovies are the only domestic ducks that are not derived from Mallard stock. They are a South American species. The original (wild type) coloration is black and white, but domestication has produced many more colors, including white, black, chocolate, and blue. The males are large, weighing up to twelve pounds, with the smaller females reaching only seven (I have heard of one Australian strain bred for market, in which a dressed male reached nearly 20 lb and took two people to restrain). Their feet have strong sharp claws and are built to grasp, so that they can perch on branches. Some people consider them ugly because of the large red warty caruncles above the beak and around the eyes. They are, however, very personable and interesting birds, and quite intelligent. Unlike most domestic waterfowl, Muscovies will often fly up and roost. They fly fairly well, especially the smaller females, but are known more for flying around than flying away!

The meat of the Muscovy is unlike that of the other domestic ducks. It is not greasy and is much more like veal than like poultry. In Taiwan and Europe they often use the Mule Duck, a hybrid of the Muscovy with Mallard-derivatives, as a meat bird.

By the age of three months or so, the males are nearly twice as large as the females. I've found that in younger Muscovies, the feet of the males are often relatively larger, but I don't know if you can count on this.


Breed clubs:

International Heavy Duck Breeders Association
Kyle Yacobucci
306 Dillenback Rd.
Palatine Bridge, NY 13428
518-673-5668
e-mail: kyleyac@yahoo.com


Muscovy Links:

MuscovyDucks.net

Northwest Wildfowl has a page on Wild Muscovies

Another page on Muscovies

Muscovy Duck Central

Pinnacle Farm's White Muscovy Ducks

Here are the Muscovies at The Easy Chicken

The Domestic Waterfowl Club on Muscovies

Poultry for small farmers: Muscovy Ducks

Muscovies at e-chickens

Witt Farms Muscovy Ducks

Shoreline Muscovies

See the Muscovies at Cottage Rose Birds n' Blossoms

Muscovies at Dunroven Farms

Thistledown's Muscovies

Welcome to Muscovy Ducks

Laughingstock Farm has Muscovies

Flip Flop Ranch

Muscovies at One Sky Ranch

Muscovies at Saynora Farms

Duckopolis has Muscovies

Ankparadiset -- A Swedish page on Muscovies (in Swedish)

Muscovies at Rare Feathers Farm

Self-blue Muscovies at Texas Peafowl Farm


Muscovy Books & Articles:

Hoffman, Edmund. 1992. A Natural History of the South American Pato, Cairina moschata, the Wild Muscovy Duck. 9th International Symposium on Waterfowl, Pisa, Sept. 16-18, 1992. Hard to find. I have a library call number for it that may help: QL696.A52H64.


A pen of Wild Muscovies: This is what the native South American birds look like

A closer shot of a Wild Muscovy hen
Photo courtesy of Dirk Fussbahn

Head shot of a two-year-old wild Muscovy drake
Photo courtesy of Daniel Sörensen

Two shots of a pair of wild Muscovies
Photos courtesy of Daniel Sörensen

[Photo of a Muscovy duck]

"Donald's" son "Huey"
for stefan

"DoubleDuck," Huey's successor, not just another pretty face
Photo ©Frank Quinn

Although Scobies can be quite pretty, too!
Photo © Jerry Jividen -- plaNET eARTh

"Catcher," DoubleDuck's son
He got his name 'cause when you toss him bread he'll pick it right out of the air (that's a piece of bread in the upper right)
Photo courtesy of Virginia Martin

"Portabello," my most recent breeding Blue drake
Photo courtesy of Stefan

"Oyster" is the best Blue I've bred
Photo courtesy of Ginger Carson

A drake with his crest raised
Photo courtesy of Ann Marshall

A Bronze Scobie drake from Sweden
Photo courtesy of Daniel Sörensen

The head of a show-quality Black Muscovy male
I find this to be extreme! The birds can hardly see. The faces on the Blues and Chocolates have not been so overdeveloped and are much more natural and balanced for the bird, in my (not very) humble opinion.

Jim Bunting's Black Muscovy drake (with a much more reasonable head)
Photo courtesy of Brian Decker

A Bronze Muscovy drake from Australia
Photo courtesy of Jason Quor

Here's a pair of Chocolate Ripple Muscovies on the left; on the right are Chocolate Ripple and Dark Ripple ducks
Photos © Cathy Dreiling

"Freeway," Tommy's drake who was found abandoned along a highway.
Photo courtesy of Tommy Green

Blue Silver and Blue Muscovy hens from Sweden
Photos courtesy of Daniel Sörensen

And a nice Black drake from the UK
Photo courtesy of Rupert Stephenson

Something new? -- A Laced Muscovy!
Photos courtesy of Ila Anderson

A Chocolate Magpie Muscovy hen from the UK
Photo courtesy of Jed Dwight

A Blue Muscovy male

A pair of Chocolate Muscovies

A Smoky Muscovy hen and a young Silver drake, both from Sweden
Photos courtesy of Daniel Sörensen

Immature male Barred Muscovies
Photo courtesy of Glenna Hendrix

A Best of Breed Muscovy drake from the UK, and his head
Photo courtesy of Rupert Stephenson

Barred Muscovy teenagers
Photo courtesy of Glenna Hendrix

Lavender and Silver Muscovies (tho' they sure don't look different to my "un-expert" eyes)
Photos courtesy of Heather Spaet

Three new varieties from Poland -- a Coffee duck, a Turtle Dove young drake and a Light Chocolate drake (in Light Chocolate the drakes are paler than the hens)
Photos courtesy of Krzysztof Andres & Piotr Sawarzyński

A Turtle Dove Muscovy hen
Photo courtesy of Ian Morrison

Barred Chocolate WhiteHead and Chocolate Pied Muscovy hens
Left photo courtesy of Frances Bassom; right photo courtesy of Laura Phillips

A Mammoth White Muscovy drake from Australia
Photo courtesy of Jason Quor

A pair of Sepia Muscovies -- note that Sepias get darker with age
Photos courtesy of Daniel Sörensen

A Self Blue duck and Cream drake
Photo © Cathy Dreiling

From Sweden comes a pair of Smoke Muscovies
Photos courtesy of Klas Hoglund

A Muscovy Duck with her brood
Photo courtesy of Robert Hockey

Here's a young female Chocolate Muscovy
Photo courtesy of Jason Halonen

"Daphne" with a brood of somewhat older ducklings

Jaclamar's White Muscovies, male on left

This is "Louis," a white Muscovy drake from Belgium
Photo courtesy of Baudewyn Meersseman

A Blue Fawn Muscovy
Photo courtesy of Heather Spaet

Silver Muscovies from Sweden
Photos courtesy of Klas Hoglund

Another very nice white Muscovy drake from Belgium
Photo courtesy of Baudewyn Meersseman

Young Muscovy hens on a fence

A Black Muscovy drake

Blue Muscovies, drake on the left
Photos courtesy of Pam Marshall

Pied Muscovies from the UK, drake on the left
Photos courtesy of Rupert Stephenson

A Silver Muscovy drake drake
Photo © Cathy Dreiling

A Ripple Muscovy drake
Photo courtesy of Rupert Stephenson

This is a Bronze Muscovy drake
Photo courtesy of Stuart Chalmers

Another Sepia Muscovy pair from Sweden
Photos courtesy of Klas Hoglund

A pair of Chocolate Muscovies from Poland
Photo courtesy of Kefas23 & Lukasz Wlodarczyk

Young Lavender Muscovies
Photo courtesy of Frances A. Bassom

Lavender Muscovies and the head of a hen
Photos courtesy of Taryn Koerker

A young Blue Barred Muscovy hen
Photo courtesy of Klas Hoglund

A pair of feral Muscovies and a close up of the male's head
Photos courtesy of Susan Bromen

A feral Scobie drake from Ontario
Photo courtesy of Laura Steininger

A feral Scobie family in Florida
Photo courtesy of Frank Figora

"Coconut," a stray or possibly feral Muscovy that was lucky enough to become a loved pet.
Photo courtesy of Amy Barroll

A Muscovy drake swimming
Photo courtesy of Baudewyn Meersseman

Barred Muscovies at three months
Photo courtesy of Lindsay Allen

A Muscovy nest
Photo courtesy of Marilyn Rhea Cheeseman

Mule Duck: A Muscovy/Silver Appleyard young drake
Photo courtesy of Pam Marshall

Hey, Mom! Where are you?
Photo courtesy of Kong Xyooj


A Muscovy duckling
Photo courtesy of Nicole Reggia

A brood of Muscovy ducklings
Photo courtesy of Klas Hoglund

A Blue Muscovy duckling

A Smoke duckling and a clutch of Sepia ducklings
Photos courtesy of Klas Hoglund

Chocolate Muscovy ducklings
Photo courtesy of Kefas23 & Lukasz Wlodarczyk


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