Guinea Hybrids

Guinea x Chicken Hybrids, aka Guin-Hens

When confined together, chickens and guineas will interbreed on occasion, and sometimes the result is a fertile egg. Survival rate in these hybrids is higher if they are more like the guinea parent (in which case the incubation period is 25-26 days). There is a lower probability of survival for those which more closely resemble the chicken (and in that case incubation is usually 21-22 days).


Guinea hybrid links:

A Pea-Guinea at Mason Hatchery

GuinHens at guineas.com

This page has pictures of a Guin-Hen, a cross between a chicken rooster and a guinea hen.

Francin Fowl


This Guin-hen (a female hatched in 2001) belongs to Pete Demas
Photos courtesy of Connie Brannon

The same bird a year later
Photo courtesy of Iona McCormick

Its mother was a Guinea and here is its father
Photo courtesy of Iona McCormick


Another Guinea x chicken hybrid
Photo courtesy of H. S. Wong


Three "Guin-hens"
Photo courtesy of H. S. Wong


The result of a Salmon Faverolles rooster on a Guinea hen
Photo courtesy of Matthew D. Crow


Imagine it! Guinea and Naked Neck crosses!!

The Guinea x Naked Neck as a chick
Photos courtesy of H. S. Wong

At 7 days old
Photos courtesy of H. S. Wong

At one month of age
Photos courtesy of H. S. Wong

And here it is at 7 months old
Photos courtesy of H. S. Wong

Another Naked Neck / Guinea cross
Photo courtesy of H. S. Wong


"Miracle" and its half siblings -- mother was a guinea, father an Easter Egger cockerel; "Miracle's" head
Photos courtesy of Brenda Warren

"Miracle" as a chick/keet (cheat?)
Photo courtesy of Brenda Warren

At 5 weeks (left) and 7 weeks
Photos courtesy of Brenda Warren

The 17-week-old "Miracle"
Photo courtesy of Brenda Warren


A year-and-a-half-old Guin-Hen and its parents
Photos courtesy of Thomas Mangham


Another Guin-hen -- this one the result of a Buff Orpington rooster on a Guinea hen
Photos courtesy of Will Lawrence


Guinea x Peafowl Hybrids

Yearling Pea-Guineas
These birds were the result of a male Blue India Peacock on a Pearl Guinea hen. Mr. Scott, the breeder, managed to keep them alive to four years of age, but none ever lived past four. They were always sterile. He repeated this breeding successfully for at least four years, always with the same results.
Photo courtesy of Maureen Johnson


Another cross of a male Peacock on a Guinea hen - note the Peahen on the left for comparison. The cross was around one-year-old when the picture was taken
Photo courtesy of Kaye Hall


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